An Interview With Ed Mueller

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The Esmeralda County History Project (ECHP) engages in interviewing people who can provide firsthand descriptions of individuals, events, and places that give history its substance. The products of this research are the recordings of the interviews and their transcriptions. The Esmeralda County Board of commissioners intitated the ECHP in 1993 in order to collect information on the origin, history, traditions, and quality of life of Esmeralda County communities that may be impacted by the construction of a high-level nuclear waste repository located at Yucca Mountain, adjoining the Nevada Test Site in Nye County.
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    An Interview with ED MUELLER An Oral History produced by Robert D. McCracken Esmeralda County History Project Esmeralda County, Nevada Goldfield 2013   iii  COPYRIGHT 2013 Esmeralda County History Project Esmeralda County Commissioners Goldfield, Nevada 89013   iv CONTENTS Preface Acknowledgments Introduction CHAPTER ONE CHAPTER TWO CHAPTER THREE CHAPTER FOUR CHAPTER FIVE CHAPTER SIX CHAPTER SEVEN CHAPTER EIGHT Addendum INDEX    v PREFACE The Esmeralda County History Project (ECHP) engages in interviewing people who can provide firsthand descriptions of the individuals, events, and places that give history its substance. The products of this research are the recordings of the interviews and their transcriptions. The Esmeralda County Board of Commissioners initiated the ECHP in 1993 in order to collect information on the srcin, history, traditions, and quality of life of Esmeralda County communities that may be impacted by the construction of a high-level nuclear waste repository located at Yucca Mountain, adjoining the Nevada Test Site in Nye County. Though the repository has yet to be built, the ten oral histories in this group of interviews were paid for by county monies received in connection with the Yucca Mountain effort, which is now in hiatus. In themselves, oral history interviews are not   history. However, they often contain valuable primary source material, as useful in the process of historiography as the written sources to which historians have customarily turned. Verifying the accuracy of all of the statements made in the course of an interview would require more time and money than the ECHP  s operating budget permits. The program can vouch that the statements were made,  but it cannot attest that they are free of error. Accordingly, oral histories should be read with the same prudence that the reader exercises when consulting government records, newspaper accounts, diaries, and other sources of historical information. It is the policy of the ECHP to produce transcripts that are as close to verbatim as  possible, but some alteration of the text is generally both unavoidable and desirable. When human speech is captured in print the result can be a morass of tangled syntax, false starts,
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