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OHSW&IM PROCEDURE Hazard Management     Purpose Definitions Roles and Responsibilities Procedure 1. Establishing the hazard management context 2. Identification of Hazards 3. Assessment of risks 4. Risk Control 5. Monitoring and Review 6. Hazard and Plant Registers Performance Measures Documents References    Purpose This procedure outlines the requirements for the management of hazards and provides a standard model for hazard management. The procedure fulfils the employer’s duty under
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    OHSW&IM PROCEDURE  Hazard Management Procedure, V1.1, October 2011 OHSW&IM Services Page 1 of  5 Disclaimer: Hardcopies of this document are considered uncontrolled. Please refer to the OHSW&IM website for the latest version.   Hazard Management   Purpose   Definitions   Roles and Responsibilities   Procedure   1.Establishing the hazard management context2.Identification of Hazards3.Assessment of risks4.Risk Control5.Monitoring and Review   6.Hazard and Plant Registers     Performance Measures     Documents     References   Purpose This procedure outlines the requirements for the management of hazards and provides astandard model for hazard management. The procedure fulfils the employer’s duty under theOHS&W Regulations 2010 to identify the hazards associated with the University’s workactivities, the working environment, the use of plant and equipment and also to assess levels ofrisk and implement appropriate risk control measures. DefinitionsHazard – is a situation that has the potential to harm a person, the environment or damageproperty. Plant – is defined in the OHS&W Act, 1986 as including any machinery, equipment, appliance,implement or tool, and any component, fitting, connection, mounting or accessory used in anyworkplace. It does not include any equipment that is both hand held and hand powered. Risk  – is the probability (likelihood) of harm or damage occurring from exposure to a hazard,and the likely consequences of that harm or damage. Risk Assessment – is the process of evaluating the probability and consequences of injury orillness arising from exposure to an identified hazard. Hazard Control – is the elimination or minimisation of risk associated with an identified hazard. Workplace – is defined as Chancellery, any Division, School, Unit, Research Institute or theCentre for Regional Engagement and its regional centres and includes any place (including anyaircraft, ship or vehicle) where a staff member works and any place where a person goes whileat work. Roles and Responsibilities Line Managers are responsible for: ã the implementation of this procedure in their area of responsibility and accountability ã completing the online learning program for hazard management ã the identification of hazards and the completion of risk assessments using theappropriate Risk Assessment form   ã the implementation of appropriate risk control measures in consultation with staffStaff are responsible for: ã not placing themselves or others at risk of injury ã reporting any hazards associated with the working environment, work tasks or activitiesto their line manager as soon as becoming aware of them    OHSW&IM PROCEDURE  Hazard Management Procedure, V1.1, October 2011 OHSW&IM Services Page 2 of  5 Disclaimer: Hardcopies of this document are considered uncontrolled. Please refer to the OHSW&IM website for the latest version.   ã participating in the development of appropriate risk control measures for identifiedhazards to eliminate or minimise risk ã using control measures as required.   Procedure1. Establishing the hazard management context  For all hazards a hazard management process must be undertaken. Establishing theparameters of the process including the criteria by which hazards will be assessed. Staffand contractors are to follow the hazard management model to ensure all hazards areidentified, assessed, controlled and evaluated for effectiveness. The level of risk is to bedetermined through the risk assessment process and recommended control measuresimplemented.Hazards are required to be identified, assessed and controlled: ã when planning work processes   ã prior to purchase, hire, lease, commissioning or erection of plant or substances   ã whenever changes are made to the workplace, system or method of work, plant orsubstances   ã whenever new information becomes available regarding work processes, plant orsubstances.   Prior to any new process being undertaken or where a new hazard has been identified arisk assessment must be completed to ensure that all risks are adequately controlled. ã For plant risk assessment use form OHSW41 - Plant Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment form   ã When all risks are adequately controlled or pose minimal risk no further action isrequired. Should further control measures be required a full risk assessment mustbe completed. No process should be undertaken unless adequate controlmeasures are in place. The completed form OHSW41 is to be forwarded to the local area nominated document control person who will enter the information intothe hazard register, OHSW1 or similar.   ã In the case of general hazard assessment, form OHSW2 is to be used. The same process as outlined above is to be implemented.   ã Hazardous substances are to be assessed as per the OHSW procedure forHazardous Substances and Dangerous Goods. ã Prior to the purchase, hire, lease, installation, erection or commissioning of anyplant, equipment or substance assessment is to be conducted in line with thePurchasing and OHSW procedure.  2. Identification of Hazards  This is the most important step in the risk management process. A hazard which is notidentified cannot be controlled. Accordingly, it is crucial that this step is ascomprehensive as possible. Hazard identification must be conducted in closeconsultation with the people performing the activity.The following are used to assist staff to identify hazards in the workplace:   ã  OHSW1 - Hazard Register   ã  OHSW79 - Pre Purchasing Checklist, Design, Plant and Substances   ã  OHSW31 - Plant Registration Register   ã  OHSW41 - Plant Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment  ã  Procedure for Workplace inspection  ã  Procedure for Incident Reporting and Investigation  ã  Procedure for Purchasing and OHSW   3. Assessment of Risks Once the hazards have been identified, the next step is to assess the risks using formOHSW41 and form OHSW31.The Risk is the probability (likelihood) of harm or damage occurring from exposure to a hazard, and the likely consequences of that harm ordamage. The greater the consequences, the greater the risk, similarly the more certainthe event, the greater the risk. Risk assessment is a process of analysis and evaluation.    OHSW&IM PROCEDURE  Hazard Management Procedure, V1.1, October 2011 OHSW&IM Services Page 3 of  5 Disclaimer: Hardcopies of this document are considered uncontrolled. Please refer to the OHSW&IM website for the latest version.   4. Risk Control Risk control must be achieved by using a predetermined hierarchy of controls. Theprimary aim of risk control is to eliminate the risk and the best way of achieving this is toremove the hazard. If this is not possible the risk must be minimised by using one ormore of the other control options from the hierarchy. The risk control measure selectedmust be the highest possible option within the hierarchy to minimise the risk to thelowest level as reasonably practicable. Existing controls should be re-evaluated todetermine if the most appropriate control measure is in place.The hierarchy of controls includes: Preference Control Example 1.   Eliminate Removing the hazard, eg taking a hazardous piece ofequipment out of service.   2.   Substitute   Replacing a hazardous substance or process with aless hazardous one, eg substituting a hazardoussubstance with a non-hazardous substance.   3.   Isolation Restricting access to plant and equipment or in thecase of substances locking them away under strictcontrols.   4.   Engineering   Redesign a process or piece of equipment to make itless hazardous. Isolating the hazard from the person atrisk, eg using a guard or barrier.   5.   Administrative   Adopting standard operating procedures (SOPs) orsafe work practices or providing appropriate training,instruction or information.   6.   PersonalProtectiveEquipment   The provision and use of personal protectiveequipment could include using gloves, glasses,earmuffs, aprons, safety footwear, dust masks.   In many cases, it will be necessary to use more than one control. Back-up controls, suchas personal protective equipment, should only be used as a last resort.While the risk control process concentrates on controlling the highest ranked risks first,this does not mean that lower ranked risks which can be controlled quickly and easilyshould not be controlled simultaneously. The best available control measures should beput in place as soon as possible, noting that in some cases it may be necessary to puttemporary controls in place until better controls can be implemented. Wherever there isa high risk the activity must cease until adequate controls are implemented.The risk control phase must take account of any necessary changes to existing controlmeasures to ensure that the best available protection is afforded. In doing so, itimportant to check current controls against the hierarchy of risk controls to determinewhether the highest option on the list is used. Where controls have been in place forsome time they are to be re-evaluated to identify improvement.As with all stages of the hazard management process, consultation is required to ensurethat management, staff at all levels and contractors can make a contribution to theidentification, assessment and control of risks associated with hazards. For specificOHS hazards there may be legislation, codes of practice or Australian standards that willprovide information to assist in the identification of what controls should beimplemented.If an identified hazard does not meet legislative requirements the use of plant,substance or work process is to be ceased immediately and locked out (if necessary)    OHSW&IM PROCEDURE  Hazard Management Procedure, V1.1, October 2011 OHSW&IM Services Page 4 of  5 Disclaimer: Hardcopies of this document are considered uncontrolled. Please refer to the OHSW&IM website for the latest version.   until modifications have been made that make the plant, substance or work processlegally compliant.Controlling hazards is critical to reduce the risk to an acceptable level. Depending on thelevel of risk of the hazard involved, the review periods in the Priority Table in the riskassessment form OHSW2 is to be used as a guide. 5. Monitoring and Review Hazard management should be an ongoing and constantly improving process. Toensure the effectiveness in eliminating or minimising risk, the process must becontinuously reviewed and steps taken to implement revised control measures, whereappropriate. It ensures that new hazards and those overlooked in the srcinal exerciseare identified and controlled.The monitoring and review process involves: ã systematically checking existing risk control measures to assess theireffectiveness; ã collecting data on any new hazards which have arisen; ã formulating new control measures.In repeating the srcinal elements of the hazard management program, other relatedactivities should be undertaken periodically and systematically as part of the monitoringand review process. These include: ã scheduled inspections; ã ongoing measurement and testing; ã workplace monitoring where necessary (for hazards such as noise orcontaminants) etc; ã periodic accident and injury analysis. 6. Hazard and Plant Registers The data collected from identifying, assessing and controlling hazards is to be recordedin the local area Hazard Register OHSW1 or similar. All plant shall be recorded in the Plant Register OHSW40 and in addition plant that is required to be registered with SafeWorkSA is to be recorded in the Plant RegistrationRegister OHSW31.   Performance measures ã All hazards identified by the work area are accurately recorded in the hazard register.   ã Risk assessments have been properly completed for all identified hazards.   ã All control measures have been implemented for identified hazards and any failure ofcontrol measures recorded and reported to the line manager.   ã All plant registers have been properly completed and all registrations are current.   Documents/Forms OHSW1 - Hazard Register OHSW2 - General Hazard Identification and Risk AssessmentOHSW8 – Safe Operating procedure   OHSW31- Plant Registration Register   OHSW40 - Plant Register   OHSW41 - Plant Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment   OHSW79 - Pre Purchasing Checklist, Design, Plant and Substances   Procedure for Purchasing and OHSW   Procedure for Workplace inspection Procedure for Incident reporting and investigation Procedure for Safe Operating Procedure Development   References University OHSW&IM Policy University OHSW Strategic Plan 2009 - 2011(PDF 158kb)OHSW & Injury Management System (PDF 128kb)Occupational Health, Safety & Welfare Act, 1986 Occupational Health, Safety & Welfare Regulations, 2010 
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