The Idiot

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The Idiot Fyodor Dostoyevsky The Idiot Table of Contents The Idiot ...............................................................................................................................................................1 Fyodor Dostoyevsky................................................................................................................................1 i The Idiot Fyodor Dostoyevsky Translated by Eva Martin ã Part I ã Chapter I ã Chapter II ã Chapter III ã Chapter IV
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  The Idiot Fyodor Dostoyevsky  Table of Contents The Idiot...............................................................................................................................................................1 Fyodor Dostoyevsky................................................................................................................................1 The Idioti  The Idiot Fyodor Dostoyevsky Translated by EvaMartin Part I ã Chapter I ã Chapter II ã Chapter III ã Chapter IV ã Chapter V ã Chapter VI ã Chapter VII ã Chapter VIII ã Chapter IX ã Chapter X ã Chapter XI ã Chapter XII ã Chapter XIII ã Chapter XIV ã Chapter XV ã Chapter XVI ã Part II ã Chapter I ã Chapter II ã Chapter IV ã Chapter V ã Chapter VI ã Chapter VII ã Chapter VIII ã Chapter IX ã Chapter X ã Chapter XI ã Chapter XII ã Part III ã Chapter I ã Chapter II ã Chapter III ã Chapter IV ã Chapter V ã Chapter VI ã Chapter VII ã Chapter VIII ã Chapter IX ã Chapter X ã Part IV ã Chapter I ã Chapter II ã Chapter III ã The Idiot1  Chapter IV ã Chapter V ã Chapter VI ã Chapter VII ã Chapter VIII ã Chapter IX ã Chapter X ã Chapter XI ã Chapter XII ã This page copyright © 1999 Blackmask Online.  PART I  I. Towards the end of November, during a thaw, at nine o'clock one morning, a train on the Warsaw andPetersburg railway was approaching the latter city at full speed. The morning was so damp and misty that itwas only with great difficulty that the day succeeded in breaking; and it was impossible to distinguishanything more than a few yards away from the carriage windows.Some of the passengers by this particular train were returning from abroad; but the third−class carriages werethe best filled, chiefly with insignificant persons of various occupations and degrees, picked up at thedifferent stations nearer town. All of them seemed weary, and most of them had sleepy eyes and a shiveringexpression, while their complexions generally appeared to have taken on the colour of the fog outside.When day dawned, two passengers in one of the third−class carriages found themselves opposite each other.Both were young fellows, both were rather poorly dressed, both had remarkable faces, and both wereevidently anxious to start a conversation. If they had but known why, at this particular moment, they wereboth remarkable persons, they would undoubtedly have wondered at the strange chance which had set themdown opposite to one another in a third−class carriage of the Warsaw Railway Company.One of them was a young fellow of about twenty−seven, not tall, with black curling hair, and small, grey,fiery eyes. His nose was broad and flat, and he had high cheek bones; his thin lips were constantlycompressed into an impudent, ironical−−it might almost be called a malicious−−smile; but his forehead washigh and well formed, and atoned for a good deal of the ugliness of the lower part of his face. A specialfeature of this physiognomy was its death−like pallor, which gave to the whole man an indescribablyemaciated appearance in spite of his hard look, and at the same time a sort of passionate and sufferingexpression which did not harmonize with his impudent, sarcastic smile and keen, self−satisfied bearing. Hewore a large fur−−or rather astrachan−−overcoat, which had kept him warm all night, while his neighbourhad been obliged to bear the full severity of a Russian November night entirely unprepared. His widesleeveless mantle with a large cape to it−−the sort of cloak one sees upon travellers during the winter monthsin Switzerland or North Italy−−was by no means adapted to the long cold journey through Russia, fromEydkuhnen to St. Petersburg.The wearer of this cloak was a young fellow, also of about twenty−six or twenty−seven years of age, slightlyabove the middle height, very fair, with a thin, pointed and very light coloured beard; his eyes were large andblue, and had an intent look about them, yet that heavy expression which some people affirm to be apeculiarity. as well as evidence, of an epileptic subject. His face was decidedly a pleasant one for all that;refined, but quite colourless, except for the circumstance that at this moment it was blue with cold. He held abundle made up of an old faded silk handkerchief that apparently contained all his travelling wardrobe, and The IdiotThe Idiot2
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